Review: The Princess and The Queen, or, The Blacks and The Greens

The Princess and The Queen, or, The Blacks and The GreensThe Princess and The Queen, or, The Blacks and The Greens by George R.R. Martin My rating: 4 of 5 stars The Princess and The Queen, or, The Blacks and The Greens is a story published in anthology “Dangerous Women”. This story tells the history of the civil war known as the Dance of the Dragons fought for the Iron Throne of Westeros between two rival branches of House Targaryen. Brutal and bloodthirsty, this story detailed what war was like when there were plenty of dragons in Westeros. This was a very enjoyable read. Recommended for anyone who’s interested in the expanded history beyond A Song of Ice and Fire series. View all my reviews

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Review: The Hedge Knight

The Hedge KnightThe Hedge Knight by George R.R. Martin

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

The Hedge Knight takes place about a hundred years prior to the events in A Song of Ice and Fire. This short story recounts the adventures of Ser Duncan the Tall who sets forth to the tourney at Ashford Meadow in search of fame and glory and the honor of upholding his oath as a knight of the Seven Kingdoms. This novella is short, interesting and a much faster read. It added further depth to the already expansive world of Westeros. Highly recommended novella for every fan of A Song of Ice and Fire series.

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Review: Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets

Homicide: A Year on the Killing StreetsHomicide: A Year on the Killing Streets by David Simon
My rating: 5 of 5 stars


Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets
written by David Simon is a non-fiction account about the time he spent with Baltimore police department homicide squad.

For a detective or street police, the only real satisfaction is the work itself; when a cop spends more and more time getting aggravated with the details, he’s finished. The attitude of co-workers, the indifference of superiors, the poor quality of the equipment—all of it pales if you still love the job; all of it matters if you don’t.

David Simon joined the Baltimore Police Department’s homicide unit as a “police intern” in 1988. During that year 234 cases of homicide took place in the city of Baltimore. This book provides a frank, detailed insight into the city’s murders and the homicide detectives who solve them. The character of each detective is portrayed brilliantly as they all have their personalities and flaws and approaches to how an investigation should be run. This book also notes how TV has skewed jurors’ perception of what evidence is required for a guilty verdict. These real-life cases are compelling and heartbreaking and also show how the detectives’ practiced emotional distance from these cases is essential for their ability to function.

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Review: The Book Thief

The Book ThiefThe Book Thief by Markus Zusak
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Set in 1939 Nazi Germany, The Book Thief is a story about Liesel Meminger narrated by Death. Liesel is fostered by the Hans and Rosa Hubermann in Molching, near Munich during World War II. Liesel becomes best friends with her neighbor Rudy, a boy who idolizes the black Olympic champion sprinter Jesse Owens.

“I guess humans like to watch a little destruction. Sand castles, houses of cards, that’s where they begin. Their great skill is their capacity to escalate.”

The Book Thief is a wonderful story full of emotions. It is simply a beautiful and painful story of a young girl as she deals with an important and tragic point in history. Death’s haunting and sympathetic narration was brilliant. It was simply an outstanding book from start to finish.

THE BOOK THIEF—LAST LINE
I have hated the words and
I have loved them,
and I hope I have made them right.

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